Monday, 30 April 2012


The Latin name dies Martis ("day of Mars" is a translation of the Greek ἡμέρα Ἄρεως). The weekday heptagram, i.e. the association of the days of the seven-day week with the seven classical planets, probably dates to the Hellenistic period. Between the 1st and 3rd centuries, the Roman Empire gradually replaced the eight day Roman nundinal cycle with the seven-day week. The astrological order of the days was explained by Vettius Valens and Dio Cassius. According to these authors, it was a principle of astrology that the heavenly bodies presided, in succession, over the hours of the day.

The name Tuesday derives from the Old English "Tiwesdæg" and literally means "Tiw's Day". Tiw is the Old English form of the Proto-Germanic god *Tîwaz, or Týr in Norse, a god of war and law.In most languages with Latin origins (French, Spanish, Catalan, Italian, Romanian, Gallician, Sardinian, Corsican, but not Portuguese), the day is named after Mars, the Roman god of war.

In some Slavic languages the word Tuesday originated from Old Church Slavonic word въторъ meaning "the second" (Serbian: уторак (utorak)). Russian "Вторник" (Vtornik) is derived from the Russian adjective for 'Second' - "Второй" (Vtoroi)

In Japanese, the word Tuesday is 火曜日(ka youbi), meaning 'fire day' and is associated with 火星 (kasei): Mars.

In the Indic languages of Pali and Sanskrit, as well as in Thailand, the name of the day is taken from Angaraka ('one who is red in colour')[5] a style (manner of address) for Mangal, the god of war, and for Mars, the red planet.